Stories

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David Dias created a Front-End Performance Checklist.

David Dias created a Front-End Performance Checklist. The checklist focuses on performance, and covers HTML, CSS, Fonts, Images and other Front-End related fields.

Tagged with: Front-End


George Brocklehurst showed how Thoughtbot used machine learning to recommend blog posts on the Giant Robots Blog.

George Brocklehurst showed how Thoughtbot used machine learning to recommend blog posts on the Giant Robots Blog. George gives a brief intro to Topic Modeling, and talks about why this approach might work better than just pairing articles by tags. Read on to see exactly how they did it.

Tagged with: Topic Modeling


TypeScript released version 3.0.

TypeScript released version 3.0. Typescript was created by Microsoft, and defines itself as "an extension of JavaScript that aims to bring static types to modern JavaScript." There are a lot of new features, but the features we are most excited about are project references, ‘--build mode’, controlling output structure, and richer tuple types.

Tagged with: TypeScript


Eugen Kiss advocates for an economic perspective towards testing

In Lean Testing or Why Unit Tests Are Worse Than You Think, Eugen Kiss advocates for an economic perspective towards testing, arguing that focusing on unit tests is not the most economic approach. He references Kent C. Dodds, suggesting that "integration tests provide the best balance of cost, speed, and confidence." I definitely agree that focusing on 100% code coverage or overwhelming reliance on mocks for unit tests are anti-patterns, but I also feel that unit tests are highly valuable for providing an opportunity to consider your API before implementation. This benefit is often overlooked. For tons of discussion on the article, there are of course comments on the orange site.

Tagged with: unit tests


9 Biggest Mistakes with CSS Grid

Jean Deux covers the 9 Biggest Mistakes with CSS Grid in a short video. The first minute is a little rough and feels like a clickbait videogame article, but tough it out! After a few moments, Jean settles in and gives an overview of common CSS Grids mistakes that she often sees. This is a wonderful talk on the subject and isn’t to be missed if you touch CSS grids at all.

Tagged with: CSS CSS Grids


[[Assembly]] Language for Beginners

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Dennis Yurichev’s book Assembly Language for Beginners is available online for free. Yurichev covers assembly in wonderful detail, even showing how some C/C++ programs compile down into assembly instructions. If you consider yourself a Computer Scientist, this book is worth a read -- especially if you don’t plan to write any assembly. You’ll gain insight into how stacks work, and why your favorite programming languages may be designed the way they are.

Tagged with: Assembly


Jenkins X is a new subproject of the Jenkins Foundation that simplifies CI/CD for application on Kubernetes.

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Jenkins X is a new subproject of the Jenkins Foundation that simplifies CI/CD for application on Kubernetes. In the introductory blog post, James Rawlings introduces the project, which is based on real-world data and scientifically proven benefits. It’s focused on seven capabilities of successful teams that were identified: Use version control for all artifacts; Automate your deployment process; Use trunk-based development; Implement Continuous Integration; Implement Continuous Delivery; Use loosely coupled architecture; and Architect for empowered teams. If you aren’t the reading type, here’s a ~10 minute video showing it off for a spring application.

Tagged with: Continuous Delivery Continuous Integration


Alex Balashov wrote a love letter to Vue.

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Alex Balashov wrote a love letter to Vue. Alex discusses Vue’s component-centric design, amazing documentation, and distinct project vision as reasons for why Vue is great. If your only experience with a FE framework is Angular 1.x, Alex can probably convince you to give Vue a try.

Tagged with: Vue


common game hacking techniques

If you’re into game development, checkout Riots Approach to Anti-Cheat, a deep dive into common game hacking techniques, and how they guard against them in League of Legends.


Rich Turner provides some history and insight into the Windows Console

Rich Turner provides some history and insight into the Windows Console in the third installment of Windows Command-Line: Inside the Windows Console. He goes into detail on the differences between the NIX terminal and the windows console (primarily: everything is a file versus everything is an object*). The article wraps up by pointing out some issues related to the way the Windows Console works, and teases news regarding how they’re addressing the issues. If you wanted to dig into the history of the UNIX TTY, you could check out The TTY demystified, still one of my favorite older articles on the history of computing.


QBasic running in a Serverless API

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Philippe Suter got QBasic running in a Serverless API. The article covers running a QBasic application inside headless DOSBox and proxying calls to it with Python. "Useless hacks for the fun of it" is my favorite category of blog post.


Donne Martin, Engineering Manager at Facebook, has built a comprehensive primer for Systems Design.

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Donne Martin, Engineering Manager at Facebook, has built a comprehensive primer for Systems Design. It will help you learn how to design large-scale systems. He’s also included Anki spaced-repetition cards for study. The primer covers high-level concepts (i.e. Performance vs. Scalability, Availability vs. Consistency, Latency vs Throughput) as well as dives deeply into various specifics you should have a deep understanding of (i.e. DNS, CDNs, Load Balancing, Service Discovery, Caching). I’ve never seen as thorough a primer on systems design in a single place, and it’s a subject dear to my heart. If you’re looking for a shorter, shallower discussion of these concepts, Jonathan Fulton from Storyblocks has written up a nice article on Web Architecture 101.

Tagged with: systems design


Elm Europe has wrapped up and the recordings of the livestreams are available.

Elm Europe has wrapped up and the recordings of the livestreams are available. You can watch day one and day two. I really enjoyed Evan’s talk on how rather than just taking the easy path and exposing the existing browser API for sizing information, he thought through use cases and ended up with a much simpler API. It’s a very solid justification for the biggest complaint people seem to have with Elm - the way that development on the core language is batched. He also points out that Java and JavaScript have had longer gaps between releases than Elm, so maybe complaining about release speed is a bit silly. Also, Matthew Griffith’s talk on building a better animation toolkit is wonderful. There are more great talks in there, so watch them all in one ~18-hour sitting.

Tagged with: elm


Guido Van Rossum has decided to remove himself from the position of BDFL in the [[Python]] community.

Guido Van Rossum has decided to remove himself from the position of BDFL in the Python community. In Guido’s letter he says "I don't ever want to have to fight so hard for a PEP and find that so many people despise my decisions." For some context read more about the PEP-572 mess, which finally has been resolved. Guido tweeted "I'm overwhelmed by the responses”, and assured his followers he would still “be around in the background!”

Tagged with: Python


Elixir: A Mini Documentary

Want insight into why and how Elixir was designed and what problems it tries to solve? Elixir: A Mini Documentary is a video with José Valim, Chris McCord and other developers talking about the beginning and the future of the language. Watch it, then get sucked into learning Elixir if you haven’t already!

Tagged with: Elixir


ESLint was compromised.

ESLint was compromised. Luckily, the issue was found rather quickly (but only because of an error in the exploit script). Affected versions include eslint-scope@3.7.2 and eslint-config-eslint@5.0.2, which were both published maliciously on the 12th of July. Read NPM’s incident report or the Postmortem from the ESLint team.


basic implementation with the CSS Paint API

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Ruth John writes a basic implementation with the CSS Paint API. Part of the Houdini CSS project, the paint API allows direct access to the engine under CSS. The long term hope is to avoid browser feature-lag in CSS by allowing devs to implement their own CSS features. The paint API is the first Houdini feature to get popular attention, and the entire project is a long way off from being useable, in terms of browser support. This feature set, combined with wasm, will give developers unprecedented access to the lower levels of browser functionality, and allow much faster and richer applications to be written.

Tagged with: Houdini paint API CSS


Finally an article talking about how microservices suck.

Welcome to another microservices are all the rage, great, fantastic, taking over the world, watch out... Just kidding! Finally an article talking about how microservices suck. Alexandra Noonan from Segment discusses why microservices worked at one point, but dont work now [for Segment.com]. Alexandra says "The overhead from managing all of these services was a huge tax on our team." They ended up replacing them all with 1 mega ‘superstar’ monolith. I don’t want to spoil it, but RIP microservies. They found that a comprehensive test suite was key to managing the monolith.

Tagged with: microservices


How not to structure your database-backed web applications: a study of performance bugs in the wild

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In Adrian Colyer’s The Morning Paper last week, he covered How not to structure your database-backed web applications: a study of performance bugs in the wild. This paper is a study on problems introduced by over-reliance on ORMs. Rather than just focusing on listing the problems, the authors actually identified and fixed them in 12 mature Rails-based applications, and measured the performance impact. With generally fewer than five lines of code to fix each issue, they saw from 2x to 39x speedups. If you maintain a Rails app, you should probably read this one. [tl;dr we’re bad at writing efficient code]

Tagged with: rails speedups