Stories

That box It's really good, and we think you'll dig our stories.

(we share code, not email addresses)

Who is ready to replace Electron? Check out Proton Native, a new way to make native desktop applications with a syntax similar to React Native.

alt text

Who is ready to replace Electron? Check out Proton Native, a new way to make native desktop applications with a syntax similar to React Native. Proton Native works with Redux, is cross platform, and did we mention you don’t have to use Electron? Take a look at the announcement, the code, and how to get started. (ed - I’m shorting RAM manufacturer stock)

Tagged with: Electron Redux Proton Native


Swizec Teller dives into why a CS degree is useful for engineers, but not mandatory.

alt text

Swizec Teller dives into why a CS degree is useful for engineers, but not mandatory. It’s valuable to learn the the principles of computer science. Whether you learn them through school or independent study is up to you. Typically people that get a computer science degree aren’t disappointed. Swizec leaves his readers with a solid quote, "It’s about knowing enough to know what to ask."

Tagged with: computer science degree computer science


Operators encode ops-knowledge around a particular service, automated inside of Kubernetes.

alt text

CoreOS released The Operator Framework: "an open source toolkit designed to manage Kubernetes native applications, called Operators, in a more effective, automated, and scalable way." In essence, Operators encode ops-knowledge around a particular service, automated inside of Kubernetes. Think “scaling and managing a Solr cluster” as an example of something that could become a fundamental feature of your cluster, rather than something you construct manually using primitives. This is a huge step forward in easing the burden of complex applications, and I’m eager to see where this framework takes us.

Tagged with: Operators kubernetes


PyCon 2018 is rolling as well!

alt text

PyCon 2018 is rolling as well! Checkout Christy Heaton’s talk on Spatial Analysis or Nicholas Tollervey’s talk on How to Make a Kids’ Code Editor. You can see the talks available, but they haven’t uploaded them all yet. The conference goes through Sunday, so if you’re in Cleveland, go to it!


Some properties of C programs hold back potentially powerful new architectures ("C programs tend to have few busy threads"), and C itself is preprocessed to appear simple in an increasingly complicated world.

David Chisnall writes an insightful piece on how C Is Not a Low-level Language. It’s the story of how our processor designs are stifled because C/C++ developers really want to pretend they’re still programming a PDP-11. Some properties of C programs hold back potentially powerful new architectures ("C programs tend to have few busy threads"), and C itself is preprocessed to appear simple in an increasingly complicated world. Perhaps we should abandon it just to get a fresh perspective on this whole software thing :) People will continue to build processors to run existing C code faster, which means future code will be built for processors like today’s processors, which is an awful cycle that we could break if we wanted to. Also if you enjoy contention you’ll like the comments.

Tagged with: C C/C++


Google IO 2018.

alt text

This week we saw Google IO 2018. The most contentious demo was Google Duplex pretending to be a human when it makes appointments for you. Flutter saw some nice talks. If you build Android apps, you’ll be interested in checking out Android Jetpack. Also, Android Things officially released version 1.0. Read all of the updates on techradar or take a look at Google’s official recap. P.S. In light of Duplex, if you haven’t read Daniel Suarez’ Daemon you should.

Tagged with: Duplex Android


Ready to read a blog post about Hackathons, TDD, Game Dev, Erlang and at least four more things?

Ready to read a blog post about Hackathons, TDD, Game Dev, Erlang and at least four more things? Take a seat, grab a cup of coffee and enjoy this delight of a piece ‘Erlang Serpents’ by Brujo Benavides. Brujo shows how Erlang Solutions built serpents, and what he learned along the way. While you’re in Erlang mode, you can check out this post on the Erlang compiler’s frontend.

Tagged with: Erlang Erlang Solutions


Jonathan Turner details what makes the the Rust community thrive, and how Rust makes decisions moving forward.

Rust has united programmers that specialize in Ruby, JavaScript and C++. Jonathan Turner details what makes the the Rust community thrive, and how Rust makes decisions moving forward. It’s pretty neat that the core rust team is only made up of 10 people. Also, a neat tidbit from the article, "Each Rust release since 1.0 has maintained backwards compatibility with all previous releases." How many other languages can say that? Let’s see how long it stays that way.

Tagged with: C++ JavaScript Ruby Rust


Netflix open sourced Titus.

alt text

Netflix open sourced Titus. Titus is the container management platform Netflix uses. It only supports AWS, so meh. However, it's still cool that Titus is now OSS, read more about it on the Netflix Tech Blog.

Tagged with: AWS container management


It’s all about the code.

Being a developer isn’t all about the code. Well, maybe it is. However, for those moments when you think its not take a look at these solid reminders. 1. Stretch and do other things to avoid Carpal Tunnel with Keyboard Gym. 2. Fire Bad Clients. 3. Learn to recognize Burnout. Who am I kidding? It’s all about the code. Checkout this new cool JavaScript Framework. Just kidding! Take care of yourself and have a good weekend. ❤️💛💚💙💜


integration tests without unit tests, testing internal implementation, paying excessive attention to test coverage, and (it pains me to say) treating TDD as a religion

alt text

Kostis Kapelonis gifted the world a 9,000+ word post on Software Testing Anti-patterns. 13 anti-patterns are detailed in depth, very thoughtfully. The most pervasive/bad of them in my opinion are integration tests without unit tests, testing internal implementation, paying excessive attention to test coverage, and (it pains me to say) treating TDD as a religion.

He ends by pointing out that "If [your team is guilty of these anti-patterns], then you are simply testing in the wrong way and no amount of tests will make your application better."

Tagged with: anti-patterns


Building a simple, async map/reduce queue for Ruby

Ruby isn’t often thought of as a highly concurrent language, but DNSimple forged a path to pull it off in Building a simple, async map/reduce queue for Ruby. Their code explores how to do multi server map/reduce backed by a queuing system that provides quick results -- querying and presenting the DNS settings of 40 servers in about half a second.

Tagged with: DNS concurrent Ruby


Been running into to issues with Active Record? Ryan Bigg has a solution, Explode Rails

alt text

Been running into to issues with Active Record? Ryan Bigg has a solution, Explode Rails. Watch his talk on Exploding Rails, read his book or look at his series of tweets. Ryan dives into alternate ways to tackle issues within Rails applications and might be able to help you with that big rails app you have.

Tagged with: rails app rails


The load test response time was much more favorable with Elixir/Phoenix

alt text

Neil Menee builds an argument for Elixir with a side by side comparison to Python, in his piece ‘Yet another "Why my company chose Elixir" story’. The load test response time was much more favorable with Elixir/Phoenix than Python with Django or Falcon. “Come for the OTP”, and “Stay for the velocity”.


tips include buying a nice mattress, having natural light, and scheduling most meetings to be 15-20 min instead of defaulting to 1 hour.

Work From Home (WFH) isn’t for everyone, but it probably would be a perfect fit for most people. More and more studies are coming out that show a boost in productivity when working remotely. Whether you WFH or in an office, you likely value productivity, which Sam Altman has a solid write up on. Some of his tips include buying a nice mattress, having natural light, and scheduling most meetings to be 15-20 min instead of defaulting to 1 hour.

Tagged with: WFH


impact, fix cost and contagion determine when or if technical debt will be dealt with.

alt text

Instead of ignoring it, Bill Clark not only seeks technical debt, but wants to understand and fix it. Bill provides a solid definition of technical debt: "code or data that future developers will pay a cost for." Bill argues impact, fix cost and contagion determine when or if technical debt will be dealt with. It’s great that technical debt is becoming a hot topic on engineering blogs, I would love to see more articles as detailed as Bill’s ‘A Taxonomy of Tech Debt’. If this tech debt article doesn’t put out the burning gaming engineering fire inside, follow it up with Michael Allar’s ‘Confessions of an Unreal Engine 4 Engineering Firefighter’.

Tagged with: gaming engineering technical debt


Mozilla let everyone in on a sneak peek at WebAssembly Studio

alt text

Mozilla let everyone in on a sneak peek at WebAssembly Studio, and it did NOT disappoint. Work started on the Web Assembly IDE the end of last year as an attempt to merge WasmExplorer and WasmFiddle. The IDE will start off with support for C, C++ and Rust. Some features include editable compiler artifacts and seeing how code is represented at a binary level. If you’re excited, watch this 20 minute demo of the beta.

Tagged with: Web Assembly


Fly.io announced the release of Edge Apps

alt text

If you would like to develop, test, and deploy your code from one spot, Fly Edge Apps is for you. Fly.io announced the release of Edge Apps, which are particularly good at optimizing images, remixing content, and not being a CDN. Edge Apps also help pre-render React apps, and can be set up with existing React apps easily (12 lines of code or less easy).

Tagged with: react Edge Apps Fly Edge Apps