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CrateDB wrote up how they made joins 23,000 times faster

If you like reading up on database internals, CrateDB wrote up how they made joins 23,000 times faster. It’s a deep-dive into implementing Block Hash Joins. In an earlier article they described the implementation of Hash Joins - this article goes into how they made it possible to perform joins when neither of the joined tables can fit into memory.

Tagged with: joined tables database


build a gameboy [[emulator]]

Introducing Cinoop, a gameboy emulator written from scratch in C. If you have time to build a gameboy emulator or time to read about one getting built, please feel free to give us a deeper dive into this story. In all seriousness, this is awesome. Check it out. It’s open source.

Tagged with: emulator


an introduction monadic programming without getting into the weeds of what a Monad is

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In Monads Made Simple, Mark Cohen provides an introduction monadic programming without getting into the weeds of what a Monad is, by working through a concrete use case. This is more valuable than any number of Monad <-> Burrito articles.

Tagged with: Monad


With Rosette you can build a program synthesizer in 20 lines of code.

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A Program Synthesizer will produce a program that satisfies a constraint. Building on seems complicated. Great news: With Rosette you can build a program synthesizer in 20 lines of code. Even greater news: James Bornhold will show you how. The synthesizer code is on Github as well.

Tagged with: Program Synthesizer


a license for when you want to release code but don’t want to suggest that the released code actually works.

The "Good Luck With That" Public License is a license for when you want to release code but don’t want to suggest that the released code actually works. "The author has absolutely no clue what the code in this project does."


Is it possible to write non-trivial codebases in C without going mad?

Is it possible to write non-trivial codebases in C without going mad? Andre Weissflog reflects on his experience with C and the 32k lines of code across 4 projects he has written. What he learned: 1. Pick the right language for a problem. 2. C + WebAssembly = 💖. 3. C99 > C89. Read the entire piece ‘One year of C’, to get a feel for the current state of C.

Tagged with: WebAssembly C


dev teams struggle to deliver ontime.

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It seems to be quite the norm that dev teams struggle to deliver ontime. Tyler Hakes discusses the high cost of poor planning, and how planning should be based on data instead of intuition. Tyler argues dev teams should plan slowly, consciously, and reliably instead of quickly, and automatically, which leads to technical debt.

Tagged with: technical debt


Learn all about the reverse emulating the NES

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Learn all about the reverse emulating the NES In Tom7’s video ‘Reverse emulating the NES to give it SUPER POWERS!’. Warning: This video gets super NES technical! Too get even more technical and process heavy watch the 40+ min video of how he made "Reverse emulating the NES’.

Tagged with: NES


GitHub sold for 7.5 billion dollars to Microsoft.

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GitHub sold for 7.5 billion dollars to Microsoft. Not everyone is happy about the decision, and there has been a lot of discussion about it. Brandon Kelly found immediate repercussions to the acquisition, and GitLab had 10x more repostories than normal on Sunday. Read GitHub’s announcement, Microsoft's announcement, GitLab’s thoughts, and Jason Fried’s prediction of this happening four years ago. Also, make sure you checkout the #1 trending repo on GitHub right now.


After 17 years, the authors take a look back on Processing’s community and personal impact.

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Processing is the coolest project that you always mean to play with and never get around to. It’s a tool to iteratively and interactively build visualizations, but it’s been extended to be much more over the years. After 17 years, the authors take a look back on Processing’s community and personal impact.

Tagged with: Processing